The greatest breakthrough in preventive dentistry during the last fifty years has been the use of fluoride.
About two-thirds of American cities add additional fluoride to their water supply for the prevention of tooth decay. In fact, fluoridation of public water systems can reduce cavities in baby teeth by 60 per cent and those in permanent teeth by 35 per cent.
There are many benefits in the use of fluoride for people of all ages. When children are young and their teeth are forming, fluoride joins with the enamel surface making it harder and more resistant to decay.
The benefits for adults are just as great. Fluoride can help repair an early cavity, even before it’s visible in the mouth, by rebuilding the enamel layer of the teeth. Fluoride is also helpful in older adults, to help solve the problem of cavities in the tooth root or with root sensitivity.
Fluoride is an important part of every prevention program. When combined with the good dental habits of brushing and flossing, the number of cavities in children and adults can be dramaticallyreduced.


Sensitive Teeth

Is the taste of ice cream or a sip of hot coffee sometimes a painful experience for you?   Does it hurt to brush or floss?    If so, you may be experiencing sensitive teeth.  Sensitive teeth can be caused by a number of things including tooth decay, fractured teeth, gum disease, worn fillings, or exposed tooth rot.  However, sensitive teeth can be treated.   Speak with your dentist if your teeth seem to be overly sensitive.  He or she may suggest one or more of a variety of treatments,  such as desensitizing toothpaste… fluoride gel… a crown or inlay… surgical gum graft…  or a root canal.  Proper oral hygiene is the key to preventing sensitive tooth pain.   Ask your dentist if you have any questions about your daily oral hygiene routine or concerns about tooth sensitivity.


Pregnancy & Teeth

It’s no secret that pregnancy is an important time in a woman’s life. However, misunderstandings about the safety of dental care during pregnancy may cause women to avoid seeing their dentist. The fact is, your dentist can create a treatment plan that is safe, effective, and essential for combating the adverse effects of oral disease during pregnancy.
The most common oral disease for pregnant women is gingivitis. This buildup of plaque that causes inflammation of the gums should be treated with a professional cleaning in addition to proper tooth-brushing and flossing. If left untreated, bacteria from excessive gingivitis can travel to the uterus and possibly trigger the production of certain chemicals suspected to induce premature labor.
If you’re planning on becoming pregnant or suspect that you are pregnant, you should see your dentist. He or she will assess your oral condition and map out a proper, safe dental plan for the rest of your pregnancy.


Sleep & Oral Health

Your sleep patterns could be impacting your oral health. A recent study suggests that lack of sleep is identified as a factor that may play a role in the progression of periodontal disease, better known as gum disease. Subjects participating in the study who slept a minimum of seven to eight hours per night exhibited greater resistance to the disease than those who slept six hours or less. Though limited, studies linking hours of sleep to dental health may indicate that a shortage of sleep can impair the body’s immune system from responding to diseases such as gum disease. Further research may suggest that lifestyle changes such as adding additional hours of sleep may improve not only our general health, but our dental health as well. Try your hardest to get at least seven to eight hours of sleep each night. It could be impacting much more than you are aware.


Cleaning Tips

Proper care of your teeth and gums can help you avoid common diseases like gingivitis. Here are five tips that adults should do each day to keep oral hygiene in tip top shape.
*Use an Electric Toothbrush
Electric toothbrushes work harder by pushing fluid between teeth and around the gum line, which provides a more effective cleaning.
* Floss at Night
It is very important to brush, floss and scrape your tongue every night to get rid of bacteria and go to bed with your mouth as clean as possible.
* Select the Right Toothpaste
Be cautious of any toothpaste that promises to “whiten” teeth.
* Don’t Forget Mouthwash
By using mouthwash before you brush, it can loosen particles of food that may not be fully removed by brushing and flossing.
* Eat Foods Good for Healthy Teeth
Certain foods naturally cleanse your teeth while you eat them. Load up on fruits like strawberries and pineapple and vegetables like kale and broccoli.

Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Cracked tooth syndrome is a real problem for many people, and is typically hard to diagnose. The signs and symptoms vary in cracked tooth syndrome making it more difficult on your dentist to pinpoint the problem. Cracked tooth syndrome can be summed up in three successive phases?: craze lines, cracks, and fractures. Craze lines are minuscule cracks in just the outer enamel of a tooth. Although not an immediate danger to the tooth, craze lines can lead to true cracks in the enamel that actually penetrate in the body of the tooth. This can lead to a very serious condition called a fracture where the crack may extend deep into the root of the tooth. The deeper the crack extends, the worse the symptoms. The most serious condition is a fracture that exposes the pulp; the actual living tissue within the tooth. Cracked tooth syndrome affects individual teeth, and can not spread from tooth to tooth.


Root Canals

Root canal treatment is necessary when the soft tissue inside your teeth becomes inflamed or diseased. This soft tissue, also known as the pulp, contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue. During a root canal treatment your dentist removes the diseased pulp. If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your entire tooth may have to be removed. Causes of an infected pulp could include: a deep cavity… repeated dental procedures…a cracked tooth…or injury to the tooth. After the root canal treatment, your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease, so regular check-ups are still necessary. Most of the time a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.


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