Archive for April, 2012

Types of Mouthwashes

Mouthwash can be an excellent supplement to your regular brushing and flossing routine.  Mouthwash comes in several different varieties, each of which has been designed to perform a certain function.  There are four basic types of mouthwash.
*Cosmetic Mouthwashes- they have been designed to combat bad breath.  They do not kill bacteria, fight plaque, or promote the overall health of your teeth.
* Antiseptic Mouthwashes- they do fight bacteria and plaque.  They provide some degree of protection against tooth decay.
* Fluoride Mouthwashes- these contain fluoride and can help fortify your teeth against decay.
* Prescription Mouthwashes- this type of mouthwash can have antibiotic properties and can be very beneficial to people that suffer from oral conditions such as mouth ulcers or swollen gum tissue

 

 

To learn more visit http://www.tupelosmiles.com or http://www.tupelodentist.com

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Dental Erosion

Have you ever noticed right after drinking certain types of drinks or sucking on a lemon that your teeth feel almost gritty?  More than likely you are experiencing dental erosion. Dental erosion is the dissolving of the surface enamel of teeth by acids found in soft drinks, carbonated beverages, fruit juices, sports drinks, and high energy drinks.  The chemical erosion that we are talking about is not like tooth decay.  It is actually the direct effect of acids attacking the outer enamel on the tooth’s surface.  Although brushing after meals may be beneficial in helping to prevent tooth decay, in cases of enamel loss by erosion, it could make it worse.  Acidic foods and beverages actually soften your tooth enamel, so wait at least thirty to sixty minutes before brushing so your enamel with have time to re harden and will be less sensitive.  If you feel you have weakened enamel, see your dentist to help you develop a care plan.

 

 

To learn more visit http://www.tupelosmiles.com or http://www.tupelodentist.com

 

Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Cracked tooth syndrome is a real problem for many people, and is typically hard to diagnose.  The signs and symptoms vary in cracked tooth syndrome making it more difficult on your dentist to pinpoint the problem.  Cracked tooth syndrome can be summed up in three successive phases: craze lines, cracks, and fractures.  Craze lines are miniscule cracks in just the outer enamel of a tooth.  Although not an immediate danger to the tooth, craze lines can lead to true cracks in the enamel that actually penetrate in the body of the tooth.  This can lead to a very serious condition called a fracture where the crack may extend deep into the root of the tooth.  The deeper the crack extends, the worse the symptoms.  The most serious condition is a fracture that exposes the pulp; the actual living tissue within the tooth.  Cracked tooth syndrome affects individual teeth, and can not spread from tooth to tooth.  Early diagnosis from your dentist is critical.

 

 

To learn more visit http://www.tupelosmiles.com or http://www.tupelodentist.com

What Should be in a Dental First Aid Kit

Dental first aid kits can be very helpful to have in or near your regular first aid kit at work, home, or in your car.  It would be a good idea to have the following items in your dental first aid kit just in case of a dental emergency. 
***Your dentist’s phone number
***Gauze and other bandages
***A handkerchief

***A small container- to store broken fragments or teeth that have fallen out. 
***A topical anesthetic for pain relief, like Orajel or Chloraseptic

***An ice pack

And any other items you may consider useful in a dental emergency.  However, make sure to not include Aspirin.  Aspirin and other anti-inflammatories, including ibuprofen, might cause clotting problems and excessive bleeding.  In the case of a dental emergency consult your dentist as soon as you can. 

 

 

 

 

 

Aside

What Should be in a Dental First Aid Kit

Dental first aid kits can be very helpful to have in or near your regular first aid kit at work, home, or in your car. It would be a good idea to have the following items in your dental first aid kit just in case of a dental emergency.
***Your dentist’s phone number
***Gauze and other bandages
***A handkerchief
***A small container- to store broken fragments or teeth that have fallen out.
***A topical anesthetic for pain relief, like Orajel or Chloraseptic
***An ice pack
And any other items you may consider useful in a dental emergency. However, make sure to not include Aspirin. Aspirin and other anti-inflammatories, including ibuprofen, might cause clotting problems and excessive bleeding. In the case of a dental emergency consult your dentist as soon as you can.