Archive for June, 2014

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Tips & FAQs

Sooner or later your child may need urgent dental care. Here are a few tips to follow, should an emergency ever occur:
***If Your child’s baby tooth is knocked out. – Call your dentist as soon as possible. The baby tooth should not be replanted as this may cause potential damage to the developing permanent tooth.
***If Your child’s permanent tooth is knocked out. – Find the tooth and rinse it in cool water. If possible, immediately replace the tooth in the socket and hold it there with clean gauze. If you can’t place the tooth in the socket, place the tooth in a clean container with cold milk, saliva, or water. Call ahead and get to your dentist’s office immediately.
***If Your child’s tooth is chipped or fractured. – Rinse the mouth with water and apply cold compresses to reduce swelling. If you can find the fragment, place it in cold milk or water, and bring it with you to your dentist’s office.
Learn more preventative strategies for reducing dental injuries from your dentist during your child’s regular check-ups.

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Pregnancy

It’s no secret that pregnancy is an important time in a woman’s life. However, misunderstandings about the safety of dental care during pregnancy may cause women to avoid seeing their dentist. The fact is, your dentist can create a treatment plan that is safe, effective, and essential for combating the adverse effects of oral disease during pregnancy.
The most common oral disease for pregnant women is gingivitis. This buildup of plaque that causes inflammation of the gums should be treated with a professional cleaning in addition to proper tooth-brushing and flossing. If left untreated, bacteria from excessive gingivitis can travel to the uterus and possibly trigger the production of certain chemicals suspected to induce premature labor.
If you’re planning on becoming pregnant or suspect that you are pregnant, you should see your dentist. He or she will assess your oral condition and map out a proper, safe dental plan for the rest of your pregnancy.

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Soft Drinks & Your Health

Soft drinks, as a part of your daily routine, can destroy your teeth. The sugar in soft drinks can cause tooth decay. The average 12 ounce can of soda contains 9 to 12 teaspoons of sugar. This is important to know because the bacteria that naturally live in your mouth survive by eating the sugar they find on your teeth. As the bacteria digest the sugar, they produce acid. your teeth are bathed in this acid for 20 minutes or more every time you drink a soda. That acid slowly dissolves the protective enamel layer of your teeth until eventually there’s a hole in the surface. This hold can grow into a serious cavity. Even diet drinks, which are sugar-free, contain both phosphoric and citric acid. So to avoid the damage that soft drinks cause, drink water, milk, or diluted fruit juices. These drinks are better for you and they’ll help you keep you smile healthy.

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Sleep & Oral Health

Your sleep patterns could be impacting your oral health. A recent study suggests that lack of sleep is identified as a factor that may play a role in the progression of periodontal disease, better known as gum disease. Subjects participating in the study who slept a minimum of seven to eight hours per night exhibited greater resistance to the disease than those who slept six hours or less. Though limited, studies linking hours of sleep to dental health may indicate that a shortage of sleep can impair the body’s immune system from responding to diseases such as gum disease. Further research may suggest that lifestyle changes such as adding additional hours of sleep may improve not only our general health, but our dental health as well. Try your hardest to get at least seven to eight hours of sleep each night. It could be impacting much more than you are aware.

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