Archive for March, 2016

Sleep and Oral Health

Your sleep patterns could be impacting your oral health. A recent study suggests that lack of sleep is identified as a factor that may play a role in the progression of periodontal disease, better known as gum disease. Subjects participating in the study who slept a minimum of seven to eight hours per night exhibited greater resistance to the disease than those who slept six hours or less. Though limited, studies linking hours of sleep to dental health may indicate that a shortage of sleep can impair the body’s immune system from responding to diseases such as gum disease. Further research may suggest that lifestyle changes such as adding additional hours of sleep may improve not only our general health but our dental health as well. Try your hardest to get at least seven to eight hours of sleep each night. It could be impacting much more than you are aware.

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Cleaning Tips

Proper care of your teeth and gums can help you avoid common diseases like gingivitis. Here are five tips that adults should do each day to keep oral hygiene in tip top shape.
*Use an Electric Toothbrush
Electric toothbrushes work harder by pushing fluid between teeth and around the gum line, which provides a more effective cleaning.
* Floss at Night
It is very important to brush, floss and scrape your tongue every night to get rid of bacteria and go to bed with your mouth as clean as possible.
* Select the Right Toothpaste
Be cautious of any toothpaste that promises to “whiten” teeth.
* Don’t Forget Mouthwash
By using mouthwash before you brush, it can loosen particles of food that may not be fully removed by brushing and flossing.
* Eat Foods Good for Healthy Teeth
Certain foods naturally cleanse your teeth while you eat them. Load up on fruits like strawberries and pineapple and vegetables like kale and broccoli.

Preventing decay

It is very important to try to prevent decay of your child’s primary teeth. As soon as teeth appear in the mouth, decay can occur.

One of the risk factors for this “baby bottle tooth decay” is frequent and prolonged exposure of a baby’s teeth to liquids containing sugar. These liquids could include milk, breast milk, formula, and fruit juice.   Tooth decay can also occur when parents or caregivers put a baby to bed with a bottle – or use milk, formula, or juice as a pacifier for a fussy baby.

If you use a pacifier, use a clean one.  Never dip a pacifier in sugar or honey before giving it to a baby.   Prolonged use of pacifiers can harm the teeth just like prolonged thumb sucking, but it is often easier to wean a child from a pacifier than a thumb.   Encourage children to drink from a cup by their first birthday, and discourage frequent use of a training or Sippy cup.   Never allow a baby to take a bottle to bed at night or naptime.

Conservative Dental Care

Conservative Dental Care is focused on preserving as much of your natural tooth and gum structure as possible. New minimumly invasive dental techniques enable us to skillfully and accurately perform the necessary work on teeth and gums while being less invasive and ultra conservative. Here are some examples: Laser Dentistry, uses state of the art water laced MD technology that can treat cavities, gums, abnormalities, and can perform a root canal. Durathin Veneers, are as thin as contact lenses and adhere directly to your teeth without any drilling, grinding, or shading. Bonding is the thin tooth-colored material that is applied to the surface of the tooth. It can cover discoloration, repair chips, and close gaps between teeth. Six Month Orthodontics are able to discreetly straighten crooked teeth in six months or less and are ideal for most adults.

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Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Cracked tooth syndrome is a real problem for many people, and is typically hard to diagnose. The signs and symptoms vary in cracked tooth syndrome making it more difficult on your dentist to pinpoint the problem. Cracked tooth syndrome can be summed up in three successive phases: craze lines, cracks, and fractures. Craze lines are minuscule cracks in just the outer enamel of a tooth. Although not an immediate danger to the tooth, craze lines can lead to true cracks in the enamel that actually penetrate in the body of the tooth. This can lead to a very serious condition called a fracture where the crack may extend deep into the root of the tooth. The deeper the crack extends, the worse the symptoms. The most serious condition is a fracture that exposes the pulp; the actual living tissue within the tooth. Cracked tooth syndrome affects individual teeth, and can not spread from tooth to tooth.

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